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Washington Post: Hearing aids will soon be sold over-the-counter. Here’s how to pick one.By Amanda Morris

Jim Oser
 

----- Original message -----
From: The Washington Post <email@...>
Subject: The Post Most: Co-founder of Trump’s media company details Truth Social’s bitter infighting
Date: Sunday, October 16, 2022 8:45 AM

Russia is grabbing men off the street to fight in Ukraine
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Co-founder of Trump’s media company details Truth Social’s bitter infighting

A whistleblower has provided The Post and the SEC with hundreds of previously unreported company messages, documents, photos and audio recordings that reveal a stunning portrait of the animosity that has built up inside Trump Media since its high-profile debut last year.

 

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Hearing aids will soon be sold over-the-counter. Here’s how to pick one.

 

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Re: projector recommendations #hybrid

Carolyn M. - Texas
 

Thanks for the info! I will follow your advice. 


Re: projector recommendations #hybrid

John Woodgate
 

Be careful. HDMI is often regarded as now 'old', but version 2.1 isn't old and is very good. The newer technique is 'Display Port', and many computers have this but not HDMI. You can get converter accessories for converting one to the other.  But some of your members or visitors may have elderly computers that only have VGA. Again, you can get an accessory that converts VGA to HDMI (without sound, of course).

I suppose consumer interest magazines rarely cover projectors now. Screens can be so big that a projector is not necessary. Do a web search for 'best video projector 2022'.

======================================================================================
Best wishes John Woodgate OOO-Own Opinions Only
www.woodjohn.uk
Rayleigh, Essex UK
It all depends



On 2022-10-13 14:51, Carolyn M. - Texas wrote:

Hello, all!
Currently one of our Chapters is looking to buy a new projector. I was wondering if anyone on here can recommend one that the chapter could use. I am hoping to get one that will work with any computer that has a HDMI connection. This would be either for playing media or online videos or for hybrid meetings. With all the changes in computers, I just want to make sure that I can give the chapter forward thinking advice. The Board has already approved the purchase, but they don't know which brand or what to look for as far as specifications. 

Any advice or suggestions?? 
Thanks, 
Carolyn McMahon


projector recommendations #hybrid

Carolyn M. - Texas
 

Hello, all!
Currently one of our Chapters is looking to buy a new projector. I was wondering if anyone on here can recommend one that the chapter could use. I am hoping to get one that will work with any computer that has a HDMI connection. This would be either for playing media or online videos or for hybrid meetings. With all the changes in computers, I just want to make sure that I can give the chapter forward thinking advice. The Board has already approved the purchase, but they don't know which brand or what to look for as far as specifications. 

Any advice or suggestions?? 
Thanks, 
Carolyn McMahon


Re: Does anyone know of a Clip-On Mic that can be "networked"? #FAQ

Mary Jarrett
 

The Roger mics are able to be one to many unlike the bluetooth hearing aid proprietary mics


Re: Does anyone know of a Clip-On Mic that can be "networked"? #FAQ

Mary Jarrett
 

I have the Roger On which can be clipped on though it also has a way to hand it on you. All of the Roger mics can be networked, and there is a smaller clip on


Re: Does anyone know of a Clip-On Mic that can be "networked"? #FAQ

 

Carolyn,

If each of you had a Roger pen I don’t know how that worked. You would have had to each wear a pen connected to every other person. How many people were there? Many pens can go to one person’s hearing aids, but a single pen can't go to many hearing aids. 

Yes. There is a wonderful clip-on mic, tiny, very effective, clips on easily and securely. It is a Phonak mic, but not a Roger. It works on bluetooth; the Roger mics are FM. I keep it in my pocket all the time. It’s called the Partner mic and costs considerably less than the Roger mics. I find it useful when I’m with only one other person. Walking is great because since that’s outside and you generally aren’t looking at the other person, it’s a game changer. Any time there is a single speaker, like a lecturer or a tour guide, it is simple to use. But it needs bluetooth to work, so it’s limited to the Marvel, Paradise, or Lumity.

Carol Agate 

On Oct 8, 2022, at 12:54 PM, Carolyn Odio <carolyn@...> wrote:

My only excellent restaurant experience was using the Roger Pen, which Steve Sells networked.  Each one of us had our Roger Pen hanging around our neck, while we ate lunch. And we could hear each other loud and clear -- even though there was tremendous background noise going on.

I am wondering if you know of a clip-on mic that could do the same thing. I only know of 1 to 1 clip-on mics. That means you can communicate with just 1 person at a time. Does anyone make a clip-on mic that can be networked?
--
Carolyn J. Odio
HLAA Washington
Resident Council Rep & 
Hearing Loss Group at www.panorama.org

(703) 725-8292 iPhone/Text 
Residence: 1835 Circle LN SE, Apt 425, Lacey, WA 98503
 
 
 


Re: Does anyone know of a Clip-On Mic that can be "networked"? #FAQ

Jaynie Kind, CA Peninsula Chapter
 

Hi Carolyn,

I use the Roger Clip-on mics in a network. At a meal, I have the Roger Pen near me for pointing at the waiter, and I give three Roger Clip-on mics to the others at my table. 

Jaynie Kind
Peninsula Chapter

On Oct 8, 2022, at 9:54 AM, Carolyn Odio <carolyn@...> wrote:

My only excellent restaurant experience was using the Roger Pen, which Steve Sells networked.  Each one of us had our Roger Pen hanging around our neck, while we ate lunch. And we could hear each other loud and clear -- even though there was tremendous background noise going on.

I am wondering if you know of a clip-on mic that could do the same thing. I only know of 1 to 1 clip-on mics. That means you can communicate with just 1 person at a time. Does anyone make a clip-on mic that can be networked?
--
Carolyn J. Odio
HLAA Washington
Resident Council Rep & 
Hearing Loss Group at www.panorama.org

(703) 725-8292 iPhone/Text 
Residence: 1835 Circle LN SE, Apt 425, Lacey, WA 98503
 

 

 


Does anyone know of a Clip-On Mic that can be "networked"? #FAQ

 

My only excellent restaurant experience was using the Roger Pen, which Steve Sells networked.  Each one of us had our Roger Pen hanging around our neck, while we ate lunch. And we could hear each other loud and clear -- even though there was tremendous background noise going on.

I am wondering if you know of a clip-on mic that could do the same thing. I only know of 1 to 1 clip-on mics. That means you can communicate with just 1 person at a time. Does anyone make a clip-on mic that can be networked?
--
Carolyn J. Odio
HLAA Washington
Resident Council Rep & 
Hearing Loss Group at www.panorama.org

(703) 725-8292 iPhone/Text 
Residence: 1835 Circle LN SE, Apt 425, Lacey, WA 98503
 

 

 


How to send an email to your Costco Hearing Aid Manager #COSTCO

 

I believe I have discovered the emails of the Hearing Department Managers at Costco...PLEASE USE WITH DISCRETION...but it you have a serious issue here it is:

Here are a couple of examples:

W740aid@... = Manager at Lacey, WA Hearing Aid Department
W064aid@... = Manager at Tumwater, WA Hearing Aid Department

You can see the format here.

The number is the Warehouse # of your Costco. You can find that number on Google Internet by searching for the Costco Warehouse.
I put in the search term: "Costco, Lacey, WA"
The result:
Notice in the URL that came up the number 740 below? That appears to be the Warehouse #:
https://www.costco.com/warehouse-locations/lacey-wa-740.html

Now you can format the email of the manager of the Hearing Aid Department!

Hope that helps!
And...having that information you can always advocate for a Portable Hearing Counter Loop, to help customers 1) test their telecoil AND 2) hear more clearly at the counter!
(of course they would need a "telecoil only setting" to really hear better at the Counter, so there is less background noise!)
--
Carolyn J. Odio
HLAA Washington
Resident Council Rep & 
Hearing Loss Group at www.panorama.org

(703) 725-8292 iPhone/Text 
Residence: 1835 Circle LN SE, Apt 425, Lacey, WA 98503
 

 

 


REMINDER - Telephone Service for the Hearing, Speech and Vision Impaired - GGCS General Meeting Monday, 9/26/22

Jim Oser
 

FYI.

REMINDER ... TONIGHT
Telephone Service for the Hearing, Speech and Vision Impaired
Triet Hoang, Field Operational Specialist, California Phones


Next GGCS General Meeting
Date: Monday, September 26, 2022 from 7:00 - 8:30 pm Pacific Time
 
Feel free to invite your friends who might benefit to join us on Zoom.
----- Original message -----
From: Golden Gate Computer Society <ggcs@...>
Subject: REMINDER - Telephone Service for the Hearing, Speech and Vision Impaired - GGCS General Meeting Monday, 9/26/22
Date: Monday, September 26, 2022 7:59 AM


View this email in your browser


REMINDER ... TONIGHT
Telephone Service for the Hearing, Speech and Vision Impaired
Triet Hoang, Field Operational Specialist, California Phones

Next GGCS General Meeting
Date: Monday, September 26, 2022 from 7:00 - 8:30 pm

Do you, a family member or friend have difficulty using land line or smart phones due to hearing, speech or vision impairments?  If so, tonight’s presenter will show you how California Phones can help. California Phones is a program of the California Public Utilities Commission that provides:
  • Over 60 different specialized telephone devices to eligible California residents free of charge.
  • A free smart phone training program that teaches participants how to use their smart phones more easily.
  • A telecommunications relay service (TRS) that allows persons with hearing or speech disabilities to place and receive telephone calls.
California Phones Field Operational Specialist and representative, Triet Hoang, has dedicated the last 12 years educating and helping California residents on how to make it easier to use their phones. He will tell us all about how you can benefit from this wonderful state resource at this meeting.

Feel free to invite your friends who might benefit to join us on Zoom.

Note: California Phones (https://californiaphones.org/), also known as the Deaf and Disabled Telecommunications Program (DDTP), is being renamed California Connect (https://caconnect.org/)


GGCS Membership Opportunity

Because in-person activities have been replaced by Zoom meetings for now, our room rental expenses have been reduced.  Therefore, the Board has reduced the annual membership fee by half.  It is presently $24, about 50 cents a week.

We still have monthly meetings with guest speakers and SIG (Special Interest Group) sessions.  They are just online for now.  We urge you to support the GGCS by joining or renewing this month.

Please send a check to GGCS, PO Box 150624, San Rafael, CA 94915-0624, or send your payment via PayPal account membership@....  Thank you for supporting GGCS.

Visit GGCS on Facebook and YouTube.




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Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #advocacy #githl-toolkit #hearingloop

 

Stephen,

You’re a good person to ask. I’ve been promoting room loops for years. I got my church to install one. I did get the T-coil logo posted on a sign outside the building but they refused to put it on the pulpit or some other conspicuous place. I also got them to put an explanation on the front page of the order of service. I don’t know of anyone but me who uses it. 

I meet a lot of people who tell me they have hearing aids because wherever I go I use accessory mics and have to explain them. That leads people to tell me they wear hearing aids and I can promote mics. But when I ask if they have telecoils no one who is not a member of HLAA (which is virtually everyone I meet outside of HLAA meetings or conventions) has ever understood the question. When people join our chapter they learn of telecoils for the first time. 

I submitted to the city council a petition signed by dozens of people explaining loops and asking that they be required in all new buildings that use amplification. The council endorsed it unanimously, but the city manager refused. He said ALDs were just as good, even tho’ the petition listed seven reasons why they were not. The manager just retired and a council member got back to me about the looping.

Here’s my problem. I am uncomfortable urging looping any more. I know many audiologists call it the “old technology,” but I’ve learned more about what is being done with bluetooth and wifi. I know it’s in the works even though they haven’t yet solved the delay problem. Also, we now have ASR as an alternative that serves the Deaf as well as those with some hearing. Loops are very expensive so I am reluctant to recommend that expenditure any more. What’s your take on that?

Thanks,

Carol  

P.S. As for the neck loops being provided. Less than half the time I attend a lecture or performance are ALDs available. Most of the venues are rented, and the organization knows nothing about them. Or they are in a locked cabinet and no one has the key. Or, most often, the batteries are dead. When they actually do have functioning ALDs there are rarely neck looks. That’s whey I started bringing my own.



On Sep 5, 2022, at 3:03 PM, Stephen O. Frazier <hlaanm@...> wrote:

Carol - you're absolutely right.  Since March of 2012 any new or substantially upgraded PA system in a qualifying place of assembly is required under the ADA to have an assistive listening system - and it must be hearing aid compatible.  That means it must be a hearing loop or it must have neckloops for 25% of the FM or IR or WiFi receivers.  There must also be  adequate signage to alert people to its presence.  That being said, it's doubtful that many communities of any size are without some venue or venues that offer telecoil connectivity. 
 
Though churches are not covered by the ADA mandate, they are the largest group of venues using either loops or neckloops for communication access.  The hearing care providers are either poorly informed or disingenuous when they offer lack of loop availability as an excuse for not counseling clients on the technology.  This also does not take into account the mobility of a large segment of the hard of hearing public that travels and has opportunities elsewhere in this country and abroad to connect to a hearing loop.
 
In my 7 years of service on the board that regulates hearing care providers in New Mexico I found that hearing aid dispensers were less supportive of the technology than audiologists but that both were opposed to being told they had to provide telecoils counseling.  After the licensing board twice voted down a counseling requirement I had to take the matter to the state legislature to get such a mandate successfully enacted.  We had support from AARP, various state agencies that deal with the HoH, church leaders, the NAD and others that convinced legislators who had no dog in this fight that they should support the needs of the hard of hearing over the objections from those who supposedly serve their needs.
 
As for loaner ALS receivers, they are likely always offered with earphones but very probably there are neckloops also available if requested.
 
If we, the hard of hearing public, want this technology we need to stand up and speak out - too few hearing care providers are going to do so.
 
 
Stephen O. Frazier, Hearing Loss Support Specialist
 
   
                 
                               Please support the
   GET IN THE HEARING LOOP
                               campaign of the
  Hearing Loss Association of America
 
 

 
            
 
              
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Carol in Boston" <carolagate34@...>
To: HLAATech@...
Cc: HLAAGITHL@..., HLAA Tech <HLAATech@groups.io>, HLAAGITHL@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HLAATech] [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #Advocacy #GITHL-Toolkit #hearingloop
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2022 14:31:20 -0400


Too often audiologists use the chicken and egg argument, that there are too few places that are looped. But what they keep missing is that it’s not necessarily looped rooms that are the reason for telecoils. Public venues are supposed to at least have assistive listening devices. (Whether they are actually available and working is another matter.) ALDs usually come with headphones, sometimes earbuds, and less often neck loops. Headphones generally don’t work well with hearing aids and earbuds not at all. Since many places don’t have neck loops, it’s simple enough to bring your own. I’ve yet to hear of an audiologist who advocates neck loops as a reason to have telecoils.

 
Carol Agate 

On Sep 5, 2022, at 12:12 PM, Stephen O. Frazier <hlaanm@...> wrote:
Hi Ginevra - You're absolutely right in your assessment that hearing care providers are a big roadblock in raising awareness and availability of telecoils and loops.  In my opinion they are the biggest one and I don't see that the situation has improved much over the last 20 years.
 
Here's a quote from a 2002 article in Hearing Review:
 
"Unfortunately, a recent survey showed that less than 50% of all hearing aid dispensers even mentioned the possibility of a telecoil to their clients. Dispensers cannot, of course, require that their clients include a telecoil in their hearing aids, but people can be given enough information so that they can make an informed choice. Many people would be more than willing to accept the need for a slightly larger hearing aid if the potential benefits of a telecoil were explained to them."
 
I believe that, since the advent of Bluetooth the percentage could even be smaller and, in reaction to looping advocacy, some providers go a step further and try to discourage clients from having the technology included in their HAs. 
 
They're often ignored and violated but state regulations mandating telecoil counseling prior to the dispensing of hearing aids help.  Only a handful of states have such regulations - many as a result of HLAA chapter advocacy - and that's what's needed elsewhere to overcome what is sometimes the outright refusal of some providers to provide such counseling. 
 
Members of this and other HLAA lists and their local chapters are the logical leaders of such efforts in any state that does not have such a requirement.  I believe it's way past time for HLAA chapters to step up and take action on this issue as we did here in NM and others have done in IN,UT, RI, DE etc.
 
Stephen O. Frazier, Hearing Loss Support Specialist
 
   
                 
                               Please support the
   GET IN THE HEARING LOOP
                               campaign of the
  Hearing Loss Association of America
 
 

 
            
 
              
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Ginevra Ralph" <GRalph@...>
To: HLAAGITHL@...
Subject: Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #Advocacy #GITHL-Toolkit #hearingloop
Date: Mon, 05 Sep 2022 08:03:28 -0700

 
Clearly one roadblock continues to be hearing specialists – maybe we could picket their conventions…
Seriously though, do you have a relationship with your own provider that you could ask some probing questions such as these:
  • ·        Do you tell all your clients about telecoils?
  • ·        Do you include telecoil as a default in new devices or does the client have to request it?
  • ·        Do they need to request Bluetooth or is it automatic?
  • ·        How many looped sites in our area would it take for our local specialists to stop saying “nothing’s looped”?
  • ·        When do you activate a telecoil in a new pair of hearing aids and do you teach the client how to use it in a looped exam space? [We have had customers show up with telecoils but they can’t use the program!!]
If everyone in a chapter asked their provider questions like this, it can provide both some local advocacy strategies and collective ones if you share the answers with all of us on your websites. [Do you suppose the answers swould be different in the UK compared to the US!?!]

--
Ginevra Ralph
The Shedd Institute, Eugene OR



Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #advocacy #githl-toolkit #hearingloop

John Woodgate
 

I agree; demo is by far the best. How about laying out, with OK from City Hall, a simple loop on the sidewalk (see, I can speak American) a nd invite people to listen it, with their hearing aids or loop listeners.

======================================================================================
Best wishes John Woodgate OOO-Own Opinions Only
www.woodjohn.uk
Rayleigh, Essex UK
It all depends



On 2022-09-05 21:35, Julie Olson HLAA in Wisconsin/Appleton wrote:

Steve, as always you’re right on target. One clarification needed though. Explaining what a telecoil does to a first time hearing aid buyer is like talking to the wind. It has to be demonstrated as well as explained. Once a person experiences it, they know why it can double the value of their hearing aids. It would also help to explain that it doesn’t add cost to the product.             Also want to mention that we’ve tried hard to get telecoil legislation in Wisconsin. HLAA is working hard on this. It’s not that easy with all the bipartisan bickering. It’s a non issue for the majority unfortunately.  There’s a need for more personal human interest stories in the media.  If only the media was interested. 😕


On Sep 5, 2022, at 11:14 AM, Stephen O. Frazier <hlaanm@...> wrote:


Hi Ginevra - You're absolutely right in your assessment that hearing care providers are a big roadblock in raising awareness and availability of telecoils and loops.  In my opinion they are the biggest one and I don't see that the situation has improved much over the last 20 years.
 
Here's a quote from a 2002 article in Hearing Review:
 
"Unfortunately, a recent survey showed that less than 50% of all hearing aid dispensers even mentioned the possibility of a telecoil to their clients. Dispensers cannot, of course, require that their clients include a telecoil in their hearing aids, but people can be given enough information so that they can make an informed choice. Many people would be more than willing to accept the need for a slightly larger hearing aid if the potential benefits of a telecoil were explained to them."
 
I believe that, since the advent of Bluetooth the percentage could even be smaller and, in reaction to looping advocacy, some providers go a step further and try to discourage clients from having the technology included in their HAs. 
 
They're often ignored and violated but state regulations mandating telecoil counseling prior to the dispensing of hearing aids help.  Only a handful of states have such regulations - many as a result of HLAA chapter advocacy - and that's what's needed elsewhere to overcome what is sometimes the outright refusal of some providers to provide such counseling. 
 
Members of this and other HLAA lists and their local chapters are the logical leaders of such efforts in any state that does not have such a requirement.  I believe it's way past time for HLAA chapters to step up and take action on this issue as we did here in NM and others have done in IN,UT, RI, DE etc.
 
Stephen O. Frazier, Hearing Loss Support Specialist
 
   
                 
                               Please support the
   GET IN THE HEARING LOOP
                               campaign of the
  Hearing Loss Association of America
 
 

 
            
 
              
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Ginevra Ralph" <GRalph@...>
To: HLAAGITHL@...
Subject: Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #Advocacy #GITHL-Toolkit #hearingloop
Date: Mon, 05 Sep 2022 08:03:28 -0700

Clearly one roadblock continues to be hearing specialists – maybe we could picket their conventions…

Seriously though, do you have a relationship with your own provider that you could ask some probing questions such as these:

  • ·        Do you tell all your clients about telecoils?
  • ·        Do you include telecoil as a default in new devices or does the client have to request it?
  • ·        Do they need to request Bluetooth or is it automatic?
  • ·        How many looped sites in our area would it take for our local specialists to stop saying “nothing’s looped”?
  • ·        When do you activate a telecoil in a new pair of hearing aids and do you teach the client how to use it in a looped exam space? [We have had customers show up with telecoils but they can’t use the program!!]

If everyone in a chapter asked their provider questions like this, it can provide both some local advocacy strategies and collective ones if you share the answers with all of us on your websites. [Do you suppose the answers swould be different in the UK compared to the US!?!]

--
Ginevra Ralph
The Shedd Institute, Eugene OR


Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #advocacy #githl-toolkit #hearingloop

Julie Olson HLAA in Wisconsin/Appleton
 

Steve, as always you’re right on target. One clarification needed though. Explaining what a telecoil does to a first time hearing aid buyer is like talking to the wind. It has to be demonstrated as well as explained. Once a person experiences it, they know why it can double the value of their hearing aids. It would also help to explain that it doesn’t add cost to the product.             Also want to mention that we’ve tried hard to get telecoil legislation in Wisconsin. HLAA is working hard on this. It’s not that easy with all the bipartisan bickering. It’s a non issue for the majority unfortunately.  There’s a need for more personal human interest stories in the media.  If only the media was interested. 😕


On Sep 5, 2022, at 11:14 AM, Stephen O. Frazier <hlaanm@...> wrote:


Hi Ginevra - You're absolutely right in your assessment that hearing care providers are a big roadblock in raising awareness and availability of telecoils and loops.  In my opinion they are the biggest one and I don't see that the situation has improved much over the last 20 years.
 
Here's a quote from a 2002 article in Hearing Review:
 
"Unfortunately, a recent survey showed that less than 50% of all hearing aid dispensers even mentioned the possibility of a telecoil to their clients. Dispensers cannot, of course, require that their clients include a telecoil in their hearing aids, but people can be given enough information so that they can make an informed choice. Many people would be more than willing to accept the need for a slightly larger hearing aid if the potential benefits of a telecoil were explained to them."
 
I believe that, since the advent of Bluetooth the percentage could even be smaller and, in reaction to looping advocacy, some providers go a step further and try to discourage clients from having the technology included in their HAs. 
 
They're often ignored and violated but state regulations mandating telecoil counseling prior to the dispensing of hearing aids help.  Only a handful of states have such regulations - many as a result of HLAA chapter advocacy - and that's what's needed elsewhere to overcome what is sometimes the outright refusal of some providers to provide such counseling. 
 
Members of this and other HLAA lists and their local chapters are the logical leaders of such efforts in any state that does not have such a requirement.  I believe it's way past time for HLAA chapters to step up and take action on this issue as we did here in NM and others have done in IN,UT, RI, DE etc.
 
Stephen O. Frazier, Hearing Loss Support Specialist
 
   
                 
                               Please support the
   GET IN THE HEARING LOOP
                               campaign of the
  Hearing Loss Association of America
 
 

 
            
 
              
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Ginevra Ralph" <GRalph@...>
To: HLAAGITHL@...
Subject: Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #Advocacy #GITHL-Toolkit #hearingloop
Date: Mon, 05 Sep 2022 08:03:28 -0700

Clearly one roadblock continues to be hearing specialists – maybe we could picket their conventions…

Seriously though, do you have a relationship with your own provider that you could ask some probing questions such as these:

  • ·        Do you tell all your clients about telecoils?
  • ·        Do you include telecoil as a default in new devices or does the client have to request it?
  • ·        Do they need to request Bluetooth or is it automatic?
  • ·        How many looped sites in our area would it take for our local specialists to stop saying “nothing’s looped”?
  • ·        When do you activate a telecoil in a new pair of hearing aids and do you teach the client how to use it in a looped exam space? [We have had customers show up with telecoils but they can’t use the program!!]

If everyone in a chapter asked their provider questions like this, it can provide both some local advocacy strategies and collective ones if you share the answers with all of us on your websites. [Do you suppose the answers swould be different in the UK compared to the US!?!]

--
Ginevra Ralph
The Shedd Institute, Eugene OR


Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #advocacy #githl-toolkit #hearingloop

Stephen O. Frazier
 

Carol - you're absolutely right.  Since March of 2012 any new or substantially upgraded PA system in a qualifying place of assembly is required under the ADA to have an assistive listening system - and it must be hearing aid compatible.  That means it must be a hearing loop or it must have neckloops for 25% of the FM or IR or WiFi receivers.  There must also be  adequate signage to alert people to its presence.  That being said, it's doubtful that many communities of any size are without some venue or venues that offer telecoil connectivity. 
 
Though churches are not covered by the ADA mandate, they are the largest group of venues using either loops or neckloops for communication access.  The hearing care providers are either poorly informed or disingenuous when they offer lack of loop availability as an excuse for not counseling clients on the technology.  This also does not take into account the mobility of a large segment of the hard of hearing public that travels and has opportunities elsewhere in this country and abroad to connect to a hearing loop.
 
In my 7 years of service on the board that regulates hearing care providers in New Mexico I found that hearing aid dispensers were less supportive of the technology than audiologists but that both were opposed to being told they had to provide telecoils counseling.  After the licensing board twice voted down a counseling requirement I had to take the matter to the state legislature to get such a mandate successfully enacted.  We had support from AARP, various state agencies that deal with the HoH, church leaders, the NAD and others that convinced legislators who had no dog in this fight that they should support the needs of the hard of hearing over the objections from those who supposedly serve their needs.
 
As for loaner ALS receivers, they are likely always offered with earphones but very probably there are neckloops also available if requested.
 
If we, the hard of hearing public, want this technology we need to stand up and speak out - too few hearing care providers are going to do so.
 
 
Stephen O. Frazier, Hearing Loss Support Specialist
 
   
                 
                               Please support the
   GET IN THE HEARING LOOP
                               campaign of the
  Hearing Loss Association of America
 
 

 
            
 
              
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Carol in Boston" <carolagate34@...>
To: HLAATech@...
Cc: HLAAGITHL@..., HLAA Tech <HLAATech@groups.io>, HLAAGITHL@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HLAATech] [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #Advocacy #GITHL-Toolkit #hearingloop
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2022 14:31:20 -0400

Too often audiologists use the chicken and egg argument, that there are too few places that are looped. But what they keep missing is that it’s not necessarily looped rooms that are the reason for telecoils. Public venues are supposed to at least have assistive listening devices. (Whether they are actually available and working is another matter.) ALDs usually come with headphones, sometimes earbuds, and less often neck loops. Headphones generally don’t work well with hearing aids and earbuds not at all. Since many places don’t have neck loops, it’s simple enough to bring your own. I’ve yet to hear of an audiologist who advocates neck loops as a reason to have telecoils.

 
Carol Agate 

On Sep 5, 2022, at 12:12 PM, Stephen O. Frazier <hlaanm@...> wrote:
Hi Ginevra - You're absolutely right in your assessment that hearing care providers are a big roadblock in raising awareness and availability of telecoils and loops.  In my opinion they are the biggest one and I don't see that the situation has improved much over the last 20 years.
 
Here's a quote from a 2002 article in Hearing Review:
 
"Unfortunately, a recent survey showed that less than 50% of all hearing aid dispensers even mentioned the possibility of a telecoil to their clients. Dispensers cannot, of course, require that their clients include a telecoil in their hearing aids, but people can be given enough information so that they can make an informed choice. Many people would be more than willing to accept the need for a slightly larger hearing aid if the potential benefits of a telecoil were explained to them."
 
I believe that, since the advent of Bluetooth the percentage could even be smaller and, in reaction to looping advocacy, some providers go a step further and try to discourage clients from having the technology included in their HAs. 
 
They're often ignored and violated but state regulations mandating telecoil counseling prior to the dispensing of hearing aids help.  Only a handful of states have such regulations - many as a result of HLAA chapter advocacy - and that's what's needed elsewhere to overcome what is sometimes the outright refusal of some providers to provide such counseling. 
 
Members of this and other HLAA lists and their local chapters are the logical leaders of such efforts in any state that does not have such a requirement.  I believe it's way past time for HLAA chapters to step up and take action on this issue as we did here in NM and others have done in IN,UT, RI, DE etc.
 
Stephen O. Frazier, Hearing Loss Support Specialist
 
   
                 
                               Please support the
   GET IN THE HEARING LOOP
                               campaign of the
  Hearing Loss Association of America
 
 

 
            
 
              
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Ginevra Ralph" <GRalph@...>
To: HLAAGITHL@...
Subject: Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #Advocacy #GITHL-Toolkit #hearingloop
Date: Mon, 05 Sep 2022 08:03:28 -0700

 
Clearly one roadblock continues to be hearing specialists – maybe we could picket their conventions…
Seriously though, do you have a relationship with your own provider that you could ask some probing questions such as these:
  • ·        Do you tell all your clients about telecoils?
  • ·        Do you include telecoil as a default in new devices or does the client have to request it?
  • ·        Do they need to request Bluetooth or is it automatic?
  • ·        How many looped sites in our area would it take for our local specialists to stop saying “nothing’s looped”?
  • ·        When do you activate a telecoil in a new pair of hearing aids and do you teach the client how to use it in a looped exam space? [We have had customers show up with telecoils but they can’t use the program!!]
If everyone in a chapter asked their provider questions like this, it can provide both some local advocacy strategies and collective ones if you share the answers with all of us on your websites. [Do you suppose the answers swould be different in the UK compared to the US!?!]

--
Ginevra Ralph
The Shedd Institute, Eugene OR


Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #advocacy #githl-toolkit #hearingloop

 

Too often audiologists use the chicken and egg argument, that there are too few places that are looped. But what they keep missing is that it’s not necessarily looped rooms that are the reason for telecoils. Public venues are supposed to at least have assistive listening devices. (Whether they are actually available and working is another matter.) ALDs usually come with headphones, sometimes earbuds, and less often neck loops. Headphones generally don’t work well with hearing aids and earbuds not at all. Since many places don’t have neck loops, it’s simple enough to bring your own. I’ve yet to hear of an audiologist who advocates neck loops as a reason to have telecoils.

Carol Agate 

On Sep 5, 2022, at 12:12 PM, Stephen O. Frazier <hlaanm@...> wrote:

Hi Ginevra - You're absolutely right in your assessment that hearing care providers are a big roadblock in raising awareness and availability of telecoils and loops.  In my opinion they are the biggest one and I don't see that the situation has improved much over the last 20 years.
 
Here's a quote from a 2002 article in Hearing Review:
 
"Unfortunately, a recent survey showed that less than 50% of all hearing aid dispensers even mentioned the possibility of a telecoil to their clients. Dispensers cannot, of course, require that their clients include a telecoil in their hearing aids, but people can be given enough information so that they can make an informed choice. Many people would be more than willing to accept the need for a slightly larger hearing aid if the potential benefits of a telecoil were explained to them."
 
I believe that, since the advent of Bluetooth the percentage could even be smaller and, in reaction to looping advocacy, some providers go a step further and try to discourage clients from having the technology included in their HAs. 
 
They're often ignored and violated but state regulations mandating telecoil counseling prior to the dispensing of hearing aids help.  Only a handful of states have such regulations - many as a result of HLAA chapter advocacy - and that's what's needed elsewhere to overcome what is sometimes the outright refusal of some providers to provide such counseling. 
 
Members of this and other HLAA lists and their local chapters are the logical leaders of such efforts in any state that does not have such a requirement.  I believe it's way past time for HLAA chapters to step up and take action on this issue as we did here in NM and others have done in IN,UT, RI, DE etc.
 
Stephen O. Frazier, Hearing Loss Support Specialist
 
   
                 
                               Please support the
   GET IN THE HEARING LOOP
                               campaign of the
  Hearing Loss Association of America
 
 

 
            
 
              
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Ginevra Ralph" <GRalph@...>
To: HLAAGITHL@...
Subject: Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #Advocacy #GITHL-Toolkit #hearingloop
Date: Mon, 05 Sep 2022 08:03:28 -0700


Clearly one roadblock continues to be hearing specialists – maybe we could picket their conventions…
Seriously though, do you have a relationship with your own provider that you could ask some probing questions such as these:
  • ·        Do you tell all your clients about telecoils?
  • ·        Do you include telecoil as a default in new devices or does the client have to request it?
  • ·        Do they need to request Bluetooth or is it automatic?
  • ·        How many looped sites in our area would it take for our local specialists to stop saying “nothing’s looped”?
  • ·        When do you activate a telecoil in a new pair of hearing aids and do you teach the client how to use it in a looped exam space? [We have had customers show up with telecoils but they can’t use the program!!]
If everyone in a chapter asked their provider questions like this, it can provide both some local advocacy strategies and collective ones if you share the answers with all of us on your websites. [Do you suppose the answers swould be different in the UK compared to the US!?!]

--
Ginevra Ralph
The Shedd Institute, Eugene OR



Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #advocacy #githl-toolkit #hearingloop

Stephen O. Frazier
 

Hi Ginevra - You're absolutely right in your assessment that hearing care providers are a big roadblock in raising awareness and availability of telecoils and loops.  In my opinion they are the biggest one and I don't see that the situation has improved much over the last 20 years.
 
Here's a quote from a 2002 article in Hearing Review:
 
"Unfortunately, a recent survey showed that less than 50% of all hearing aid dispensers even mentioned the possibility of a telecoil to their clients. Dispensers cannot, of course, require that their clients include a telecoil in their hearing aids, but people can be given enough information so that they can make an informed choice. Many people would be more than willing to accept the need for a slightly larger hearing aid if the potential benefits of a telecoil were explained to them."
 
I believe that, since the advent of Bluetooth the percentage could even be smaller and, in reaction to looping advocacy, some providers go a step further and try to discourage clients from having the technology included in their HAs. 
 
They're often ignored and violated but state regulations mandating telecoil counseling prior to the dispensing of hearing aids help.  Only a handful of states have such regulations - many as a result of HLAA chapter advocacy - and that's what's needed elsewhere to overcome what is sometimes the outright refusal of some providers to provide such counseling. 
 
Members of this and other HLAA lists and their local chapters are the logical leaders of such efforts in any state that does not have such a requirement.  I believe it's way past time for HLAA chapters to step up and take action on this issue as we did here in NM and others have done in IN,UT, RI, DE etc.
 
Stephen O. Frazier, Hearing Loss Support Specialist
 
   
                 
                               Please support the
   GET IN THE HEARING LOOP
                               campaign of the
  Hearing Loss Association of America
 
 

 
            
 
              
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Ginevra Ralph" <GRalph@...>
To: HLAAGITHL@...
Subject: Re: [HLAAGITHL] HLAA Not Promoting Telecoil & Hearing Loops #Advocacy #GITHL-Toolkit #hearingloop
Date: Mon, 05 Sep 2022 08:03:28 -0700

Clearly one roadblock continues to be hearing specialists – maybe we could picket their conventions…

Seriously though, do you have a relationship with your own provider that you could ask some probing questions such as these:

  • ·        Do you tell all your clients about telecoils?
  • ·        Do you include telecoil as a default in new devices or does the client have to request it?
  • ·        Do they need to request Bluetooth or is it automatic?
  • ·        How many looped sites in our area would it take for our local specialists to stop saying “nothing’s looped”?
  • ·        When do you activate a telecoil in a new pair of hearing aids and do you teach the client how to use it in a looped exam space? [We have had customers show up with telecoils but they can’t use the program!!]

If everyone in a chapter asked their provider questions like this, it can provide both some local advocacy strategies and collective ones if you share the answers with all of us on your websites. [Do you suppose the answers swould be different in the UK compared to the US!?!]

--
Ginevra Ralph
The Shedd Institute, Eugene OR


The Whats and Whys of Hearing Tests #Announcement

Sara Oser, President, HLAA North Bay of California
 

Thursday September 8, 4:00 pm Pacific Time: Colleen Polite Au.D. presents at Chapter Meeting (Zoom) The What and Why of Audiological Evaluations. Colleen Polite is on the team of the UCSF Douglas Grant Cochlear Implant Center.* She evaluates patients for cochlear implant candidacy and after implantation works with patients over time to get the best hearing results with the technology. Bring your audiograms. What kind of tests do audiologists do and why? How are the tests related to the audiogram?

*The UCSF Douglas Grant Cochlear Implant Center has been involved in developing and implanting cochlear implant systems for more than 35 years. Our team includes experienced audiologists, surgeons, psychologists and other experts, who are dedicated to providing the most advanced technology and highest-quality care. Each year, we evaluate and treat thousands of adults and children. Our services include evaluation, counseling, surgery, device programming and testing, and rehabilitation.

Register: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIscOitrzssHt2QioB7ywfBkNISrQZ3DvQw

Information: 415-710-7281


Re: Final-version captioning #poll-notice

 

Edited might be the wrong word. Real time guesses each utterance as it is spoken. Final version is looking at the last few seconds of utterances which give it context. The extra context means it can guess better and will fix some words. Last few seconds is actually just the sound between pauses in speech.


Re: Final-version captioning #poll-notice

Tony Ferack
 

I haven't yet voted but does "Final Version" captions mean the raw captions from a CART provider that have been edited?


On Sat, Aug 6, 2022 at 11:38 AM Alan Katsura, Moderator, CA Diablo Valley Chapter <akatsura@...> wrote:

A new poll has been created:

Has anyone experienced "final-version" captions? Read the message titled "Captioning question" #captions

1. No - never heard of it
2. No - heard of it
3. Yes - positive experience
4. Yes - negative experience

Click Here To Vote

Do not reply to this message to vote in the poll. You can vote in polls only through the group's website.


--
Alan Katsura
akatsura@...
Moderator HLAA Tech Group

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